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mymusicmasterclass:

New studies have been emerging highlighting the benefits of music for many diseases, etc.  Who knows, maybe “healing music” will become a major market in the next 10 years.  Could music therapy become a growth industry?  Very interesting and exciting stuff…

Article at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/274336.php

Hear, hear!

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Learning the first part of “My Wild Irish Rose”

First time I realized this I had flashbacks to Friends and Monica’s flower.

manicpixiedreamsuccubus:

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Getting to the last line:

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Sometimes I get on my high horse about music therapy and I’m like…

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Judith Pinkterton, MT-BC/L, speaks about the use of music therapy and music medicine when working with veterans and hospital patients. Judith is an amazing advocate for music therapy and was essential to the creation of the first license of music therapy in Nevada. 

Learn more about music and wellness a Judith’s website Music4Life.us

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maddiecrossley asked: Hello! Im currently a freshman in college and Im very interested in Music Therapy as a profession. However, the university I attend does not offer a bachelors in Music Therapy. I was considering doing a double bachelor major in either Communication Sciences and Disorders and Music Education, or Music Education and Psychology. What do you recommend?

Hello there!

Part of the reason I love being a music therapist is because there is diversity in possible specializations. The difference between your options seems to be a question of breadth vs. depth. With a communications sciences and disorders major, you’ll be more limited in scope than a general psychology degree. If you’re looking into specializing in Neurologic Music Therapy (more information HERE) this might be a smart move with its emphasis on rehabilitation and other brain disorders. 

I have dual degrees in MT and Psychology and have found that my psych degree has given me an invaluable overview of how the mind works. Understanding the big picture and where music therapy fits into cognition, learning, behaviorism, etc. has informed my practice everyday and gives me insight about where my co-professionals are coming from. Ultimately, only you can answer which is a better fit for your future.

PS- If you plan on getting a Master’s or Equivalency degree in music therapy, be sure to see the requirements for these types of programs. Make sure to share this with your Music Education adviser and work him/her to make sure you’ll be prepared for that next step.

Best of luck!

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humansofnewyork:

"I’m studying music therapy. I just finished observing a music program for children with disabilities, and I’m taking notes.""So what’s something you observed?""Many of the children had some form of autism. And it seemed that playing music together gave them the satisfaction of contributing to a group and forming relationships, without the pressure of having to speak or maintain eye contact."

humansofnewyork:

"I’m studying music therapy. I just finished observing a music program for children with disabilities, and I’m taking notes."
"So what’s something you observed?"
"Many of the children had some form of autism. And it seemed that playing music together gave them the satisfaction of contributing to a group and forming relationships, without the pressure of having to speak or maintain eye contact."

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Two Chord Songs

Learning guitar from scratch is tough. It’s harder finding two chord songs to practice with that aren’t childish. Here are some of my favorite two chord songs that work with adult populations:

A Horse with No Name by America (em/Dmaj7)

Singing in the Rain (C/G)

Buffalo Gals (C/G)

Day-O (The Banana Boat Song) (C/G)

Jambalaya by Hank Williams (A/E)

What are other favorite two chord songs that I missed?

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Utah Music Therapy Legistlation Signed Into Law

April 3, 2014 01:35 PM

The American Music Therapy Association (AMTA) and the Certification Board for Music Therapists (CBMT) are excited to announce that, on Tuesday, April 1, 2014, Governor Gary Herbert of Utah signed into law HB 277. This legislation creates a state certification designation for board certified music therapists granted by Utah’s Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing.

Many thanks to the members of the Utah Task Force (Maureen Hearns, Letha Mark, Tiffany Andersson, Emily Bailey, Melou Cline, Emily Horton, and Jaycie Vorhees), to the bill’s sponsor, Representative Rebecca Edwards, to Utah State University’s Director of Government Relations, Neil Abercrombie, and to all the music therapists in Utah for your work, dedication, and advocacy for this legislation. Your commitment to securing state recognition for music therapy will serve to benefit Utah’s citizens by allowing them to more easily access music therapy services provided by qualified practitioners.

via The American Music Therapy Association